Call: 0800 001 5078
Request a Quick Quote

Glossary of photocopier terms

Here we explain industry jargon for you so that you clearly know what to ask for and get the photocopier you need.

AFP

Advanced Function Presentation is a software and hardware architecture and language that describes graphics and text, understood by printers used in mainframe environments.

AUTOMATIC EXPOSURE CONTROL

The amount of light necessary to properly expose the selected original (i.e.: coloured paper, poor quality original) is automatically adjusted.

ANALOGUE COPIER

Mirrors and lens components transfer the scanned image to a photoconductor. The mirrors direct the light through the lens and then to the drum.

ADF

The Automatic Document Feeder holds a stack of originals and feeds them automatically, one at a time to the exposure glass for copying and scanning.

AUTOMATIC START

During the warm-up period, the user can enter copy commands and functions. After warm-up is completed, copying will begin automatically.

BATES STAMPING

This is primarily used in legal applications, and refers to the numbering of legal documents. When large numbers of documents are involved, this can be done automatically by printers or during the scanning process.

CONTINUOUS COPIES

The ability to make copy after copy without the user having to press the start key at the end of each copy cycle.

CONTINUOUS MODE

Enables the photocopier to continue producing photocopies until the paper runs out.

COPY SIZE

Refers to the paper size and minimum and maximum copy area that the copier can utilise.

CONSOLE COPIER

The weight, design or dimensions of these photocopiers prohibit desktop support, and are therefore free standing with feature built-in consoles.

CPM

Copies Per Minute.

DESKTOP COPIER

The weight, design or dimensions of these photocopiers allow desktop support or optional stand.

DEVELOPER

This is the substance that carries the toner in the developer unit. Toner particles are charged through the friction of the developer, which causes attraction to the oppositely charged drum.

DEVELOPMENT

The process where the toner is applied to the image on the photoconductor drum.

DIGITAL COPIER

These photocopiers scan the image of a document and prepare it for digital processing, basically converting images to computerised data. All multifunctional copiers are digital, though not all digital copiers are multifunctional.

DJDE

Dynamic Job Descriptor Entry is a production printer language developed by Xerox that maps data to forms.

DRUM

This is the heart of a photocopier on which the image is formed. It consists of an aluminum core with multiple layers of light and charge sensitive material.

DUPLEX

The process of copying, scanning or printing images on both sides of a piece of paper.

ELECTRONIC SORTING (E-SORT)

The sorting is done by the computer within the photocopier. For example if you are making two copies of a four page document, a photocopier with e-sort will produce pages 1,2,3,4 and then 1,2,3,4 unlike a photocopier that does not electronically sort that would produce pages 1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4.

ENERGY SAVE MODE

After copying and a preset time period, the photocopier automatically goes into a standby mode to conserve energy.

ENLARGEMENT

The ability to increase the size of the image of the original on a photocopy.

EPS

Encapsulated Post Script is a file format used to transfer post script information from one program to another.

FIRST COPY TIME

Time required when the start key is pressed to the time when the first copy arrives at the exit tray.

FUSING

A process used to permanently stick the toner particles to the copy paper. Most commonly, heat and pressure applied by a heat lamp inside two rollers.

IMPOSITION

The process of modifying the orientation, printing order and position of pages in a document, and grouping collections of pages together on larger sheets of paper so that the pages are arranged properly for printing and binding.

IPDS

Intelligent Printer Data Streams is a language invented by IBM that contains information to control, monitor and identify functions of printers used in mainframe environments. This information includes printer characteristics, resolution, resources, memory and whether it receives and prints a job.

MANUAL BYPASS

This facility allows operators to photocopy on to different paper stock, without changing paper trays or cassettes.

MAXIMUM ORIGINAL SIZE

The largest original that can be placed on the glass and copied.

MAXIMUM COPY SIZE

The largest size paper that can be put through the machine.

MAXIMUM / MINIMUM PAPER WEIGHTS

The recommended paper weights for use in the copier.

METACODE

A standard print language that describes graphics and text, understood by Xerox, Heidelberg and OCE printers.

MULTI-COPY

The greatest number of copies that the copier is programmed to produce from one original.

MULTI-COPY SPEED

The number of copies produced per minute from one original in a continuous run after the first copy exits. This is also the maximum copy output speed of the photocopier.

NIC

The Network Interface Card enables a digital photocopier to become a network printer.

OCR

Optical Character Recognition is a computerised process that allows you to convert a paper document into a computer file that you can search and manipulate using a word processor.

OPTICS

Mirrors and lens components of the conventional analog photocopier that convey the scanned image from the glass to the photoconductor drum.

PAPER CAPACITY

The maximum amount of paper a photocopier can store in the paper tray.

PAPER TRAY

A removable cassette, where blank paper is stored for copying.

PCL

Printer Control Language was invented by Hewlett-Packard Corporation, and describes the graphics and text in documents. PCL is also known as a page-description language and HP-PCL.

PDF

Portable Document Format was invented by Adobe Systems Incorporated and is a file format that describes the graphics and text in documents. It’s a unique page-description language.

PDL

A page-description language is a computer language that describes the text and graphics in a document. The best-known PDLs are:

  • AFP (invented by IBM)
  • PCL (invented by Hewlett-Packard Corporation)
  • PDF (invented by Adobe Systems Incorporated)
  • PostScript (also invented by Adobe Systems Incorporated)


PHOTO MODE

The photocopier ability to copy photographs or halftones more clearly

PLATEN

The platen (or exposure glass) is the plate of glass upon which the original is placed for copying.

PPML

Personalised Print Markup Language is an XML-based language for variable-data printing, developed by The Digital Printing Initiative.

POSTSCRIPT

A language and file format used for describing graphics and text in documents, invented by Adobe Systems Incorporated. It is also known as a page-description language.

RASTERISATION

The process of converting code that describes text and graphics into the format that is required by a printer. It is performed by a Raster Image Processor.

REDUCTION

A function that enables the user to decrease the size of the image on the copy paper.

RIP

A Raster Image Processor is a software program or device that converts page-description language code to the format required by the printer.

SCAN ONCE PRINT MANY (SOPM)

Single scan systems scans the document once and prints multiple copies.

SINGLE DOCUMENT FEEDER (SDF)

The document must be manually pulled through the feed mechanism each time a copy is needed.

SORTER

A device for use when producing collated copies.

TONER

A plastic-carbon based substance that has the appearance of dry powder and forms the image on the paper.

VARIABLE DATA PRINTING

A form of on-demand printing in which all the documents in a print run are similar but not identical. For example, if you are printing personalised letters to be mailed to your customers, each document has the same basic layout, but there is a different customer name and address on each letter.

WARM-UP TIME

The amount of time required for the copier to become operable after being switched on.

XML

Extensible Markup Language is a method for describing information so that
computers (and humans) can understand it easily.

ZOOM

Enlargement or reduction modes can be selected by the user in 1% increments. Magnification percentages (+/-) usually range from 65% to 155%.